Long Island Horticultural Society

What's Going on in the Garden

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Summer To Do List

Maintain

Summer Pruning: Cut back delphiniums and salvias after they bloom; they may rebloom later. Deadhead annuals such as snapdragons, verbenas, zinnias to keep them blooming. Pinch back tall fall-blooming plants several times for bushier growth. Prune bigleaf hydrangea, such as Mop Heads and Lacecaps, directly after they flower. Increase the flower size of dahlias and mums by removing half of their buds. Remove dead wood from the inside of hedges to promote airflow.


Mosquito Controls: Plants that repel mosquitos: Lemongrass, Lantana, citronella
DIY mosquito trap: Cut a 2 liter soda bottle 1/3 from the top, invert the top into the bottle to create a funnel tape in place, cover with a black sock, black material, or paint black. Mix up 1 cup of warm water, 1/2 cup brown sugar, and 1 teaspoon of yeast. Pour into premade soda bottle and set 50 feet away from dining area, patio ect. to create a mosquito free zone. The mosquitoes are attracted to the CO2 the yeast gives off they stay around the bottles and not around you!
Watch JoAnn Semeraro's
video on how to make your own mosquito repellents.


Lawn care: Mow lawns to 3 inches to help them best conserve moisture and shade out weeds. Water deeply and infrequently rather than lightly and often.


Veggies: Perk up tomato plants with a drink of fish emulsion in midsummer. Water tomatoes evenly to avoid blossom-end rot. 


Water: Keep new plantings watered well—an inch per week through their
first summer. Keep the gardener well watered too-
Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

Pick your spots to work outside. Anticipate heat waves and humidity, and get your work done on the days most pleasant for working outdoors.

The heat and humidity of mid-summer bring with them plant diseases. Inspect your plants for any diseased foliage now, remove it, and dispose of it properly (do not put it in the compost pile).

Never use a liquid feed on dry plants; water them with plain water first.

Harvest

Pick zucchini and squash frequently to keep it producing. Harvest herbs before they bloom for the most flavor.

Preserve Summer vegetable crops like cucumbers, green beans, runner beans, zucchini, beets, carrots, onions, shallots, potatoes, and salad greens can all be ready to harvest during the summer. If you’ve grown more than you can eat right now, it’s time to preserve the harvest for the cooler months. Have a canning party, make fridge pickles, start fermenting, fill up the freezer, or make smoothie cubes. Donate extras to your local food bank, find your local food bank: www.ampleharvest.org  Now is a great time to dry any herbs and spices from your garden and store them for year-long use. Dry some oregano for your tomato sauce and some dill for winter fish dishes. Harvest some rosemary and freeze some chives. You’ll be glad you did when the ground is blanketed in snow, but you’re enjoying the flavors of your garden from the warmth of the indoors.

Enjoy Edible Flowers Summer is the perfect time to add a few edible flowers to your garden-to-table meals. Zucchini plants can contribute a few extra flowers to the grill, and herbs like nasturtium can add an unexpected zip to a salad.

Plan

 

Plan for a fall veggie garden of broccoli, kale, lettuce and others.

Order bulbs for fall planting early to be sure you get your first choices.